Category - Finger Lakes History

Why the Finger Lakes Are Great, Too

Friday, March 8, 2019 10:00 AM by Melissa Knoblauch

Occupying the top five spots on the list of largest lakes in the United States, there’s no doubt the Great Lakes make an impression. But lakes Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie and Ontario aren’t the only lakes that are great. New York’s Finger Lakes, while smaller in size, punch well above their weight in terms of scenery, attractions, activities, food and drink. And the deeper you dive, the more you discover!

We’ve rounded up just a few reasons the Finger Lakes deserve the “great” title, too.

Every February, Americans honor the contributions and achievements of African-American culture during Black History Month. The overwhelming response and support of what started as a weeklong celebration in 1926 helped expand the event to an entire month 50 years later when President Gerald Ford beckoned the country to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.”

Path Through History Weekend in Ontario County

Wednesday, October 3, 2018 4:00 PM by Kendall Knaak

As most New Yorkers know, our state has a rich and storied history—from the 13 colonies to a state with one of the country’s largest populations. A couple of times a year, New York likes to celebrate that history through its Path Through History weekends.

But what does Path Through History mean, exactly? 

Canandaigua Treaty of 1794 Commemoration

Monday, November 6, 2017 8:00 AM by Peter Jemison

The United States and the Haudenosaunee entered into a treaty of peace and friendship on November 11, 1794.

For the Haudenosaunee, this brought an end to the Revolutionary War and the hostilities that existed between them and American settlers. The Treaty demarcated the lands reserved to the Haudenosaunee (Six Nations) by the terms of the treaty.

The treaty also spells out how disagreements that may arise are to be addressed by the executive branch of the American Government. The treaty tests the words of the U.S. Constitution, which identifies treaties as the supreme law of the United States. The Canandaigua Treaty bears George Washington’s signature and was ratified by the U.S. Senate in January 1795.